Kryn Miner in Afghanistan. Miner, an Army veteran who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, was shot to death in Essex, Vt., by one of his children in April after threatening to kill the family. His wife, Amy, says the Veterans Affairs health system must do more to help veterans who struggle with PTSD after returning home.
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Kryn Miner in Afghanistan. Miner, an Army veteran who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, was shot to death in Essex, Vt., by one of his children in April after threatening to kill the family. His wife, Amy, says the Veterans Affairs health system must do more to help veterans who struggle with PTSD after returning home. (AP photo courtesy of Amy Miner)

By Gregg Zoroya
USA Today

The Pentagon and VA are not ready for a potential flood of war-related post-traumatic stress disorder among troops and veterans, particularly from the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, a panel of leading scientists report in a study released Friday.

“We are at the cusp of a wave of PTSD,” says Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist and professor at Columbia University who chaired the committee of 16 experts for the Institute of Medicine, the health arm of the National Academy of Sciences.

The committee, directed by Congress, spent four years producing a 300-page report on how the Defense Department and the Department of Veterans Affairs handle PTSD.

“We greatly appreciate and respect the extensive scientific review and insights of the Institute of Medicine committee,” says Robert Jesse, the VA acting undersecretary for health. “We will address these recommendations.”

The Pentagon issued a statement acknowledging “critical gaps” and …

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